The Canadian economy shed 213 thousand jobs in January of 2021, well above market forecasts of a 47.5 thousand decline and following 53 thousand drop in the previous month. Losses were entirely in part-time work and were concentrated in Central Canada, with losses in Ontario and Quebec totalling 251,000. Employment also fell in Newfoundland and Labrador. Employment declined in January in three services-producing industries most affected by new and continuing public health restrictions: accommodation and food services (-8.2%), retail trade (-7.4%), and information, culture and recreation (-2.4%). Employment losses were more than twice as large among youth aged 15 to 19 (-74,000; -9.3%) than among those aged 20 to 24 (-34,000; -2.2%). source: Statistics Canada

Employment Change in Canada averaged 16.10 Thousand from 1976 until 2021, reaching an all time high of 952.90 Thousand in June of 2020 and a record low of -1993.80 Thousand in April of 2020. This page provides the latest reported value for - Canada Employment Change - plus previous releases, historical high and low, short-term forecast and long-term prediction, economic calendar, survey consensus and news. Canada Employment Change - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on February of 2021.

Employment Change in Canada is expected to be 60.00 Thousand by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. Looking forward, we estimate Employment Change in Canada to stand at 70.00 in 12 months time. In the long-term, the Canada Employment Change is projected to trend around 23.00 Thousand in 2022, according to our econometric models.

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Canada Employment Change

Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
-212.80 -52.70 952.90 -1993.80 1976 - 2021 Thousand Monthly
Volume, SA


Calendar GMT Actual Previous Consensus TEForecast
2020-11-06 01:30 PM Oct 83.6K 378.2K 100K 110K
2020-12-04 01:30 PM Nov 62K 83.6K 20K 60K
2021-01-08 01:30 PM Dec -62.6K 62.1K -27.5K -20K
2021-02-05 01:30 PM Jan -212.8K -52.7K -47.5K -35K
2021-03-12 01:30 PM Feb -212.8K
2021-04-09 12:30 PM Mar
2021-05-07 12:30 PM Apr
2021-06-04 12:30 PM May


News Stream
Canadian Economy Cuts More Jobs than Expected
The Canadian economy shed 213 thousand jobs in January of 2021, well above market forecasts of a 47.5 thousand decline and following 53 thousand drop in the previous month. Losses were entirely in part-time work and were concentrated in Central Canada, with losses in Ontario and Quebec totalling 251,000. Employment also fell in Newfoundland and Labrador. Employment declined in January in three services-producing industries most affected by new and continuing public health restrictions: accommodation and food services (-8.2%), retail trade (-7.4%), and information, culture and recreation (-2.4%). Employment losses were more than twice as large among youth aged 15 to 19 (-74,000; -9.3%) than among those aged 20 to 24 (-34,000; -2.2%).
2021-02-05
Canadian Economy Cuts More Jobs than Expected
The Canadian economy shed 63 thousand jobs in December of 2020, compared to market forecasts of a 27.5 thousand decline and following a 62.1 thousand increase in the previous month. It was the first decrease in employment since April, as part-time jobs fell by 99 thousand while full-time work went up by only 36.5 thousand. Self-employment decreased by 62 thousand to its lowest point since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, while the number of employees in both the public and private sectors was little changed. Employment declined in Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Prince Edward Island and held steady in the other six provinces. Employment fell in industries most directly affected by new and continuing public health measures, including accommodation and food services (-56.7 thousand); "other services" (-30.8 thousand) and information, culture and recreation (-18.8 thousand).
2021-01-08
Canadian Economy Adds The Least Jobs in 6 Months
The Canadian economy created 62 thousand jobs in November of 2020, well above forecasts of a 20 thousand rise and after an 83.6 thousand increase in October. Still, it is the lowest number since the recovery began six months ago as full-time work went up by only 99 thousand and 37 thousand part-time jobs were shed. Self-employment stalled and compared to public sector and private sector employees, employment in this group remained furthest from the February pre-COVID level. Increases were seen in Ontario, British Columbia and in all four Atlantic provinces. Employment growth resumed in the goods-producing sector in November, with most of the increase in construction. At the same time, employment in the services-producing sector was little changed, for the first time since the recovery began in May. Among youth aged 15 to 24, employment rose 0.9% from October, while the youth unemployment rate fell 1.4 percentage points to 17.4%.
2020-12-04
Canadian Economy Adds Less Jobs than Expected
The Canadian economy created 83.6 thousand jobs in October 2020, below market forecasts of a 100 thousand rise and after a 378.2 thousand increase in September. Most of the employment increase was in full-time work (+69,000). Self-employment increased for the first time since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Increases were seen in five provinces (Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island). Meantime, employment growth stalled in transportation and warehousing, and in construction, while it resumed in retail trade. Among youth aged 15 to 24, employment was little changed from September. Employment remained further from full recovery for youth than for all other major age groups.
2020-11-06

Canada Employment Change
In Canada, employment change refers to the change in the number of persons who work for pay or profit, or perform unpaid family work. Estimates include both full-time and part-time employment.