The Ulster Bank Construction PMI in Ireland rose to 47.0 in September 2020 from 44.0 a month earlier. Activity on commercial projects neared stabilization (49.2 vs 41.6 in August) in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, while civil engineering fell at the slowest rate since January (44.2 vs 42.3). Meantime, housing activity shrank faster (44.1 vs 44.7). New orders moderated, while the lengthening of delivery times was unprecedented prior to the pandemic's outbreak. Supply shortages were also a factor behind a sharp increase in input costs. The rate of inflation accelerated to the fastest since April 2019 and was steeper than the series average. This was despite a modest reduction in demand for inputs as buying activity was scaled back for the second month running. Finally, sentiment fell to a four-month low, amid renewed concerns toward Brexit.

Construction Pmi in Ireland averaged 55.71 points from 2013 until 2020, reaching an all time high of 68.80 points in February of 2016 and a record low of 4.50 points in April of 2020. This page provides - Ireland Construction Pmi- actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news. Ireland Ulster Bank Construction PMI - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on October of 2020. source: Markit Economics

Construction Pmi in Ireland is expected to be 50.20 points by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. Looking forward, we estimate Construction Pmi in Ireland to stand at 52.40 in 12 months time. In the long-term, the Ireland Ulster Bank Construction PMI is projected to trend around 53.40 points in 2021 and 52.50 points in 2022, according to our econometric models.

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Ireland Ulster Bank Construction PMI

Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
47.00 44.00 68.80 4.50 2013 - 2020 points Monthly
SA


News Stream
Irish Construction Sector Shrinks at Softer Rate
The Ulster Bank Construction PMI in Ireland rose to 47.0 in September 2020 from 44.0 a month earlier. Activity on commercial projects neared stabilization (49.2 vs 41.6 in August) in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, while civil engineering fell at the slowest rate since January (44.2 vs 42.3). Meantime, housing activity shrank faster (44.1 vs 44.7). New orders moderated, while the lengthening of delivery times was unprecedented prior to the pandemic's outbreak. Supply shortages were also a factor behind a sharp increase in input costs. The rate of inflation accelerated to the fastest since April 2019 and was steeper than the series average. This was despite a modest reduction in demand for inputs as buying activity was scaled back for the second month running. Finally, sentiment fell to a four-month low, amid renewed concerns toward Brexit.
2020-10-12
Irish Construction Shrinks for First Time in 3 Months
The Ulster Bank Construction PMI in Ireland tumbled to 44.0 in August 2020 from 53.2 a month earlier. This was the first drop in the construction sector since May, amid greater market uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic and some recent signs of a cooling in the wider economy’s recovery momentum. The weakness was broadly based, with each of the main sub-sectors reporting declining activity: housing (44.7 vs 57.8 in July), commercial (41.6 vs 50.2), and civil engineering (42.3 vs 42.1). New orders declined following a return to growth in July, buying activity dropped for the first time in three months, while, suppliers' delivery times continued to lengthen at a considerable rate. Input prices increased for the fourth consecutive month, but the rate of inflation eased and was softer than the series average. Finally, sentiment weakened though remained positive.
2020-09-14
Ireland Construction PMI Highest in 11 Months
The Ulster Bank Construction PMI in Ireland rose to 53.2 in July 2020 fro 51.9 a month earlier. This was the second straight month of growth in the sector and the fastest since August last year. Housing activity expanded the most in a year (53.2 vs 51.9 in June), while commercial construction rose further (50.2 vs 50.9). Meanwhile, activity on civil engineering projects continued to fall (42.1 vs 43.4). New orders increased for the first time in five months, amid the loosening of the coronavirus lockdown. Also, buying activity went up modestly as part of efforts to ramp up activity to get back closer to normal levels. Meantime, employment fell again, albeit at the slowest pace in the current five-month sequence of workforce contraction. On the cost front, input prices increased for the third month running and at the fastest since February. Finally, sentiment strengthened to a four-month high on hopes that the pandemic will subside.
2020-08-10
Ireland Construction Activity Returns to Growth
The Ulster Bank Construction PMI in Ireland was at 51.9 in June of 2020, up from 19.9 in the previous month, and marking the first reading above the 50.0 mark for the first time in four months to signal an increase in construction activity at the end of the second quarter. Activity across three broad categories recorded sharply gains: housing (55.8 vs 21.4 in May), commercial (50.9 vs 25.6), and civil engineering (43.4 vs 14.9). In contrast, the Covid-19 pandemic continued to impact negatively on new business during June, resulting in a fourth successive monthly decline. Prices data showed input prices rose sharply, with the rate of inflation accelerating from that seen in the prior month. Finally, sentiment remained downbeat amid concerns regarding the ongoing impact of the pandemic.
2020-07-13

Ireland Ulster Bank Construction PMI
The Ulster Bank Construction Purchasing Managers’ Index® is a seasonally adjusted index designed to track changes in total construction activity in Ireland. Data are collected at mid-month, asking respondents to compare a variety of business conditions with the situation one month ago. A reading of below 50.0 indicates that the economy is generally declining, above 50.0 that it is generally expanding and exactly 50.0 indicates no change on the level recorded the previous month.