The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI plunged to 36.0 in April 2020 from 45.1 in March, the lowest since March 2009, as the economic fallout from lockdowns imposed across Europe and the wider world led to a collapse in demand. Output, new orders, exports and purchasing all fell at the fastest rates in the 22-year survey history. Also, the rate of job shedding was the joint-fastest on record, matching the pace recorded in February 2009. Meantime, backlogs of work contracted the most since September 2011, continuing a sequence of depletion that began in September 2018. Price data showed input costs dropping the most since March 2016 amid a plunge in oil prices. Meanwhile, manufacturers cut their charges at the strongest rate since August 2019, in an attempt to bring in revenues. Looking ahead, business sentiment hit a new record low as companies expected a recession in the aftermath of the coronavirus crisis.

Manufacturing PMI in Ireland averaged 53.19 points from 2011 until 2020, reaching an all time high of 59.10 points in December of 2017 and a record low of 36 points in April of 2020. This page provides the latest reported value for - Ireland Manufacturing PMI - plus previous releases, historical high and low, short-term forecast and long-term prediction, economic calendar, survey consensus and news. Ireland Manufacturing PMI - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on May of 2020. source: Markit Economics

Manufacturing PMI in Ireland is expected to be 43.00 points by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. Looking forward, we estimate Manufacturing PMI in Ireland to stand at 51.10 in 12 months time. In the long-term, the Ireland Manufacturing PMI is projected to trend around 52.70 points in 2021 and 53.80 points in 2022, according to our econometric models.

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Ireland Manufacturing PMI

Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
36.00 45.10 59.10 36.00 2011 - 2020 points Monthly
SA


News Stream
Irish Manufacturing Shrinks the Most in 11 Years
The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI plunged to 36.0 in April 2020 from 45.1 in March, the lowest since March 2009, as the economic fallout from lockdowns imposed across Europe and the wider world led to a collapse in demand. Output, new orders, exports and purchasing all fell at the fastest rates in the 22-year survey history. Also, the rate of job shedding was the joint-fastest on record, matching the pace recorded in February 2009. Meantime, backlogs of work contracted the most since September 2011, continuing a sequence of depletion that began in September 2018. Price data showed input costs dropping the most since March 2016 amid a plunge in oil prices. Meanwhile, manufacturers cut their charges at the strongest rate since August 2019, in an attempt to bring in revenues. Looking ahead, business sentiment hit a new record low as companies expected a recession in the aftermath of the coronavirus crisis.
2020-05-01
Ireland Manufacturing Shrinks the Most Since August 2009
The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI slumped to 45.1 in March 2020 from 51.2 in a month earlier. This was the first contraction in the sector in three months and the steepest since August 2009, as the coronavirus outbreak accelerated outside mainland China. Output, new orders and exports all fell at the fastest rates since the first half of 2009, while sentiment was negative for the first time since this series began in mid-2012.
2020-04-01
Irish Manufacturing Growth Little-Changed
The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI was at 51.2 in February 2020, little-changed from 51.4 in January, pointing to the second straight month of growth in the sector. Amid post-transition Brexit, domestic political uncertainty and virus-related disruption, both output and new orders grew at faster paces. Meanwhile, employment fell again and new export orders shrank for the eight time in ten months. On the price front, input price inflation accelerated from January's low, though the index was still at the third lowest since July 2016. In contrast, prices charged rose at the fastest rate since March 2019, and one that remained above the historical trend. Looking ahead, sentiment moderated.
2020-03-02
Irish Manufacturing Sector Returns to Expansion
The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI rose to 51.4 in January 2020 from 49.5 in the prior month. The latest reading pointed to the first increase in factory activity since October, as new orders, output, purchasing and jobs all expanded following contractions in December, while export demand steadied amid reports of a stable US economy and improving UK market. In terms of prices, January data signalled a general lack of cost inflationary pressure in the manufacturing sector. Input price inflation slowed to a 42-month low, and was well below the long-run survey average. In contrast, output prices increased at the strongest rate since March 2019, pointing to improving profitability. Looking ahead, The Future Output Index posted its largest one-month gain in over three years and signalled the strongest overall sentiment since last May. Confidence was linked to new products, the installation of new plant machinery and greater certainty regarding Brexit.
2020-02-03

Ireland Manufacturing PMI
The AIB Ireland Manufacturing PMI Ireland measures the performance of the manufacturing sector and is derived from a survey of 258 industrial companies. The Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index is based on five individual indexes with the following weights: New Orders (30 percent), Output (25 percent), Employment (20 percent), Suppliers’ Delivery Times (15 percent) and Stock of Items Purchased (10 percent), with the Delivery Times index inverted so that it moves in a comparable direction. A reading above 50 indicates an expansion of the manufacturing sector compared to the previous month; below 50 represents a contraction; while 50 indicates no change.