The Stanbic Bank Kenya PMI fell to 34.8 in April of 2020 from 37.5 in the previous month, pointing to the biggest contraction in private sector activity since October of 2017, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Output fell at a record pace as firms were hampered by falling demand, input shortages and lockdown restrictions. Workforces were cut, with businesses also lowering wages in an effort to keep costs subdued as revenues deteriorated. Finally, despite lower expectations, Kenyan firms were still positive that the economy would grow over the coming year and many companies said that they would open new branches and increase spending on products, services and marketing once lockdown measures were lifted.

Manufacturing Pmi in Kenya averaged 51.93 points from 2014 until 2020, reaching an all time high of 57.70 points in December of 2014 and a record low of 34.40 points in October of 2017. This page provides - Kenya Manufacturing Pmi- actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news. Kenya CfC Stanbic Bank PMI - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on June of 2020. source: Markit Economics

Manufacturing Pmi in Kenya is expected to be 45.00 points by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. Looking forward, we estimate Manufacturing Pmi in Kenya to stand at 51.80 in 12 months time. In the long-term, the Kenya CfC Stanbic Bank PMI is projected to trend around 52.00 points in 2021 and 52.60 points in 2022, according to our econometric models.

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Kenya CfC Stanbic Bank PMI

Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
34.80 37.50 57.70 34.40 2014 - 2020 points Monthly
SA


News Stream
Kenya Private Sector Activity Shrinks Faster in April
The Stanbic Bank Kenya PMI fell to 34.8 in April of 2020 from 37.5 in the previous month, pointing to the biggest contraction in private sector activity since October of 2017, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Output fell at a record pace as firms were hampered by falling demand, input shortages and lockdown restrictions. Workforces were cut, with businesses also lowering wages in an effort to keep costs subdued as revenues deteriorated. Finally, despite lower expectations, Kenyan firms were still positive that the economy would grow over the coming year and many companies said that they would open new branches and increase spending on products, services and marketing once lockdown measures were lifted.
2020-05-06
Kenya Private Sector Activity Shrinks the Most since 2017
The Stanbic Bank Kenya PMI slipped to 37.5 in March of 2020 from 49 in the previous month, pointing to a sharp deterioration in business conditions that was the strongest since October of 2017. New orders declined significantly, amid reduced demand due to the coronavirus pandemic. Firms consequently reduced activity and employment, while demand for inputs fell at the quickest pace since late-2017. On the price front, input costs rose at the fastest pace since June of 2019, amid reports of shortages of inputs mostly from China. However, selling prices went up only marginally. Looking ahead, the overall level of business sentiment remained strong, despite the impact of the pandemic. Firms cited plans to widen products and services and open new branches, though some respondents noted these plans were on hold until after the virus has been brought under control.
2020-04-03
Kenya Private Sector Shrinks for 2nd Month
The Stanbic Bank Kenya PMI declined to 49.0 in February 2020 from 49.7 in the prior month, pointing the second straight downturn in the country's private sector. Output shrank for the second month in a row, while new orders dropped for the first time in over two years due to subdued demand, as a result of ongoing cash flow issues in the economy. However, employment growth accelerated to a 3-month high. Input buying rose modestly, although stocks continued to grow as firms remained hopeful of a rebound in activity in the near future. On the price front, input price inflation rose to a six-month high, amid higher prices for fuel and foodstuff. Also, raw material prices increased, linked to reduced imports from China due to the coronavirus outbreak. Accordingly, output prices went up for the third straight month and the most since July 2019. Lastly, confidence in the year-ahead outlook neared the highest on record, amid hopes of a rebound in activity in the near future.
2020-03-04
Kenya Private Sector Shrinks for 1st Time in 9 Months
The Stanbic Bank Kenya PMI declined to 49.7 in January 2020 from 53.3 in the previous month, pointing the first contraction in the country private sector since April last year. Output shrank at the sharpest pace in over two years, amid reports of weaker demand due to generalised cash flow problems in the economy and poor weather conditions. As a result, new orders and employment growth slowed. Purchasing activity also increased less, though stock levels continued to rise sharply. On the price front, input price inflation rose further, amid higher prices for commodities, fuel and flowers. Subsequently, output prices went up for the second straight month. Lastly, confidence soared to a near-record level as launches of new products, branch opening, and projections of rising demand should lead to a return to growth.
2020-02-05

Kenya CfC Stanbic Bank PMI
In Kenya, the CfC Stanbic Bank Purchasing Managers' Index measures the performance of agriculture, mining, manufacturing, services, construction and retail sectors and is derived from a survey of 400 companies. The Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index is based on five individual indexes with the following weights: New Orders (30 percent), Output (25 percent), Employment (20 percent), Suppliers’ Delivery Times (15 percent) and Stock of Items Purchased (10 percent), with the Delivery Times index inverted so that it moves in a comparable direction. A reading above 50 indicates an expansion of activity compared to the previous month; below 50 represents a contraction; while 50 indicates no change.